Picture Gallery

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The Stained Glass windows - click to enlarge

Saint Edmund

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'Saint Edmund's Window' stained glassSt Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'Saint Edmund's Window' stained glassThis lancet window is located in the Chancel on the North wall. The stained glass was given by the Rev’d William Heberton Karslake of Meshaw, as a memorial to his father, the Rev’d William Karslake: incumbent of Dolton from 1803 to 1861.

Our patronal saint is depicted with a halo to honour his sainthood and is wearing a robe of royal purple that is seen at its best only when looking at the actual window. He is wearing a crown to signify he was a King and carries a golden sceptre and an arrow. The arrow Edmund is holding portrays the extreme torture he endured, during which he was shot by many arrows, which are described as looking like the bristles of a hedgehog. He was then beheaded still calling upon Jesus.

His shield is represented by an azure background and a fleury cross in gold surrounded by five gold martlets.

The North Lancet or 'Music' Window

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Music Window' stained glassThere is debate about the significance of this stained glass lancet window in the chancel. It is probably an image of a bearded King David, with the golden crown of sovereignty on his head, playing a twelve stringed harp/lyre. King David was known to keep his harp beside him and compose sacred songs, known to us as the Psalms of David, in praise of God.

“David would take up his harp/lyre and play.” 1 Samuel 16: verse 23

However, as the lancet window is near to the sanctuary, the most sacred part of the church, and overlooks the choir stalls, the window could also reflect Psalm 150.

“Praise God in his sanctuary.” Verse 1; “….Praise him with the harp and lyre.” Verse 3 “Let every thing that has breath praise the Lord.” Verse 6

The Stafford and Copleston Roundel Window in the North Aisle

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Stafford and Copleston Roundel Window' stained glassThis family crest commemorating the marriage of Thomas Stafford and Ann Copleston, circa 1445, was probably taken from elsewhere and installed by the Victorian restorers of Saint Edmund’s as a centrepiece in the window. The Stafford Crest has four pears set between crossed glazier’s snipping irons. It combines the craft of stained glass making with a variety of pear popular around 1450.

The crest is shown side by side on the same shield with the Copleston’s of Colebrook. The Copleston’s crest is an engrailed red chevron set between the faces of three blue leopards.

The Stafford and Yeo Roundel Window in the North Aisle

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Stafford and Yeo Roundel Window' stained glassThe Stafford Crest has four gold (or) Caillouet pears set between crossed glazier’s snipping irons. This window celebrates the marriage of Philip Stafford and Alice Yeo of Heanton, circa 1475. The Stafford crest is shown side by side on the same shield with the Yeo family crest. The Yeo crest has three ducks azure. Early photographs show that the window may have been mounted in reverse by the Victorians with the ducks and the pears looking the wrong way. This has been corrected.

You may be interested in the Yeo Society website

The Epiphany Window - "The Adoration of the Magi"

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Epiphany Window' stained glassSt Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Epiphany Window' stained glassThe window portraying the Epiphany is located in the south aisle. The three angel figures at the top may give credence to the lancet window above the choir stalls representing Psalm 150, for the top figure is sounding the cymbals, the angel bottom left is believed to be playing a bowed stringed instrument called a rabab. and the one bottom right is playing a lute.

“Praise him with stringed instruments.” Psalm 150 Verse 4 “Praise him with the clash of cymbals.” Psalm 150 Verse 5

The centre panel portrays Mary with the baby Jesus.

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Epiphany Window' stained glass St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Epiphany Window' stained glass St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Epiphany Window' stained glass

In the left panel, legend has it that the young magus, Casper, presented gold as a gift. Here he is depicted in medieval clothing; the gold replicated as a crown for kingship.

In the right hand panel another magus, the bearded Melchior, is offering frankincense in a container with a lid having a spire pointing heavenward. The two together symbolise Worship and Divinity.

The third magus, Baltasar, has a chalice containing myrrh, the bitter sweet herb of mortality.

The Transfiguration Window

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Transfiguration Window' stained glassSt Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Transfiguration Window' stained glassThe window portraying the Transfiguration is in the south aisle near to the entrance door to the church. It was presented “To the Glory of God in memory of John and Elizabeth Hooper by their son William”.

The window shows Jesus shining in glory, and the presence of Moses and Elias (Elijah), confirming the fulfilment both of the Law and the Prophets of the Old Testament to the three disciples.

 

‘His face shone like the sun, and his clothes became as white as white.’ Matthew 17:2
‘Just then there appeared before them Moses and Elijah, talking with Jesus.’ Matthew 17:3

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Transfiguration Window' stained glassSt Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Transfiguration Window' stained glassMoses was the pioneer who led the people out of slavery to set his people free and gave the people the 10 commandments.

The presence of the prophet Elijah demonstrated that Jesus was all that the prophets promised.

‘Peter said to Jesus, “Lord it is good for us to be here!” ‘ Matthew 17:4

Here Saint Peter, Saint James the Great and Saint John, the three disciples, are dazzled by brightness and shield their eyes as God reveals Jesus’s divinity to three unsuspecting witnesses.

‘A voice came out of the cloud saying, “This is my beloved son – Hear him”.’ Matthew 17:5
St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Transfiguration Window' stained glass St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Transfiguration Window' stained glass

The Peake Window or “Mary’s Window”

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Peake Window' stained glass

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Peake Window' stained glassThe Peake, or “Mary’s” window is at the end of the south aisle.

This window and the church clock were presented by Ann Peake in memory of her mother Mary Jane Peake and her brother Alfred David Peake in December 1947.

 

 

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Peake Window' stained glassSt Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Peake Window' stained glassThe window shows narrative scenes from the life of Mary, the mother of Jesus.

In the left hand panel the Angel Gabriel speaks to Mary. Luke 1:30

In the next panel the virgin Mary is holding the Christ child who raises his hands in blessing.

 

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Peake Window' stained glassSt Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Peake Window' stained glassThe right hand panel probably shows Mary, the mother of Jesus, being comforted after the crucifixion, or it may be of Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of James the Younger. Mark 15: 40 and Mark 16:1

In the top half of the left hand panel Adam and Eve can be seen in the garden of Eden with the snake and the forbidden apple. Genesis 3
This is where it all began and, with the resurrection, is where it begins again.

 

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Peake Window' stained glassThe top half of the right hand panel portrays the night, as Joseph slept, when an angel came to him in a dream. "Don't be afraid, Joseph,” the angel said, “Mary will give birth to a son and you will name him Jesus."

When Joseph woke up he knew what the angel had said was true.
Matthew 1:23-24

 

The Sanctuary Window

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' stained glassThis magnificent window in the Sanctuary area of the church was presented in memory of the Rev’d William Kerslake, Rector of St. Edmund’s Church from 1803 – 1861. It portrays scenes from the life of Christ. Although it is truly a most beautiful window, nothing is always perfect and there is a small error created by the stained glass glaziers. It takes some time to discover!

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' stained glassIn the very top panel are the letters I H S denoting the first three letters of the Greek name for ‘Jesus’. The Greek letter iota is represented by I, and the eta by H, while the letter sigma is represented in its final form as an S. “IHS” is sometimes interpreted as meaning Iesus Hominum Salvator (‘Jesus, Saviour of Men’ in Latin). Some uses have even been created for the English language, where "IHS" is interpreted as an abbreviation of "I Have Suffered" or "In His Service".

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' stained glassThe swan in the panel below left is an ancient symbol of perfection, spiritual grace and purity. If looked at in close-up three cygnets can be seen.

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' stained glassThe lamb, in the right hand panel below the IHS panel, is a Christian representation of Jesus.

 

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' - stained glassThe panel on the bottom left of the Sanctuary window shows John the Baptist, in his camel hair clothes and red cloak, baptising Jesus in the River Jordan. Matthew 3:4

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' - stained glassAs soon as Jesus was baptised, he went out of the water. At that moment heaven was opened, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and lighting on him. And a voice from heaven said, “This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased.” Mark 3:17

The centre panel at the bottom of the window shows a scene from the Last Supper. “Do this in remembrance of me.” Luke 22:19

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' - stained glassThe panel at the bottom right is a scene after the crucifixion. It shows the crucified Jesus with Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus. They had purchased a linen winding-cloth and about one hundreds pounds of crushed myrrh and aloes. They wrapped the body in the manner St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' - stained glasscustomarily followed by the Jews in preparing a body for burial. The rock that Joseph had recently had a tomb from can be seen near Golgotha. Notice the white horse/mule

The central panel of the Sanctuary window shows Jesus with a lamb on his left shoulder and his right hand lifted in blessing. We are represented by the lamb, or sheep, being carried by Jesus. Such an image is re-assuring:

Jesus is our support through life. When crosses and problems come our way, or some personal disaster occurs, this image of Jesus the Good Shepherd reassures us that we are not abandoned, that Jesus is supporting and holding us up

The left hand panel has six of the Apostles, each with their own iconic symbols:

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' stained glass St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' stained glass

Saint John

Saint Andrew

Saint Matthew

Saint James the Less

Saint Thomas

Saint Philip

Examining some of the saints in the panel, Saint John is represented by a cup with a winged dragon flying out of it – to the tradition about Aristomedes, priest of Diana, who challenged John to drink a cup of poison. John made a sign of the cross on the cup and ‘Satan flew like a dragon from it’. John then drank from the cup which was quite innocuous.

Saint Andrew, brother of Peter, according to tradition was martyred by crucifixion on a diagonal cross. In the panel the wooden cross is green.

Saint Thomas is shown with a spear head as he was stabbed to death with a spear in India circa AD 72 .

Saint Philip is shown here as an elderly man and the crucifix reminds us that he was crucified upside down circa AD 80.

In the right hand centre panel are six more of the apostles:

St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' stained glass St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' stained glass St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' stained glass St Edmund's Dolton, Devon - 'The Sanctuary Window' stained glass

Saint Peter

Saint Simon

Saint Paul

Saint Jude

Saint Bartholomew

Saint James the Great

Among the saints shown, Saint Peter is portrayed with the key. Jesus said to Peter, “And I will give you the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven.” Matthew 16:17

Saint Simon has the attribute of a carpenter’s saw because he was put to death with a saw.

Saint Paul is represented by the Sword of the Spirit, which is the Word of God.

Saint Jude is the patron saint of lost causes and is often depicted holding a cross.

Saint James the Great is depicted here as a pilgrim with a walking stick and a drinking vessel. He was the first apostle to be martyred and is the patron saint of pilgrims.

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